Archive | Easy to grow produce

What to do with extra (large) Zucchini – 3 Delicious Recipes

This article will explain what to do with extra (large) Zucchini by giving 3 delicious recipes.

Every year my garden produces way more zucchini than we can keep up with. We are always giving zucchini away to friends and neighbors but even so, we end up with extra large zucchinis that we don’t want to go to waste. This summer, we discovered a few ways to put these zucchinis to good use. Here are 3 easy recipes that work great with large Zucchini:

1. Grilled Zucchini

What to do with extra (large) Zucchini - 3 Delicious Recipes

This is so easy to do and really delicious. All you need to do is slice the zucchini into long flat strips that are about 1/4″ thick. I usually leave the skin on to hold the pieces together better. Then, put the zucchini on your BBQ and pour a little bit of soy sauce on each piece. Then, add salt and pepper.

What to do with extra (large) Zucchini - 3 Delicious Recipes

When you flip the pieces of zucchini over, the soy sauce, salt, and pepper will all get grilled into the zucchini adding a ton of flavor. Once the zucchini starts turning slightly transluscent, you know it’s ready. Take it off to serve and enjoy!

2. Zucchini as a pasta replacement in Pesto

This is one of the coolest things we discovered this summer. My brother-in-law told us about this and then made it for us at a family reunion. It was so delicious! What you do is make normal pesto (we typically buy the pesto mix at the store but you can also make your own if you have lots of basil handy), but instead of adding pasta noodles, you use zucchini noodles from your large zucchini. To prep the zucchini, use a thick cheese grader or simply cut the zucchini into thin spaghetti like strips. Then, quickly cook the zucchini for about 4 minutes. Put it into a strainer to let it drain. Then, add to your pesto mix in place of adding pasta noodles with a little bit of olive oil and additional fresh basil if you have it. Mix it up and add some salt and pepper to taste. That’s it. Now you have a low-carb, delicious, and healthy meal that uses up your large zucchini.

3. Zucchini Bread or Muffins

Zucchini Bread or Muffins is the default go to use of large zucchinis. Zucchini bread not only tastes delicious, but it is also really healthy for you because of the large amount of zucchini you use. There are dozens of recipes online that you can choose from. Here are a few links to ones that I like:

  • Super Moist Zucchini Bread or Muffins (healthy): http://allrecipes.com/recipe/super-moist-zucchini-bread/
  • Mom’s Zucchini Bread: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/moms-zucchini-bread/

Do you have additional recipes or ways that you use zucchini? Let us know in the comments.

If you have never grown zucchini or any other produce of your own, TogetherFarm has made a much easier way for you to do that. We want everyone to experience the benefits and flavor or homegrown produce and so we have created a modular garden box that doesn’t require tools to build and can be built in any shape or size. The modular garden box system is called TogetherFarm Blocks. The blocks are made from 100% recycled food-grade plastic so they are good for the environment too! You can pre-order your garden box kit on Kickstarter by following this link:

TogetherFarm Blocks on Kickstarter

Kickstarter Campaign for TogetherFarm Blocks

5,456 total views, 3 views today

Gardening with Recycled Materials

IMG_0449

We’ll keep it short on words and long on pictures in this post as we review different ways of gardening using recycled materials.  My wife and I prepped and planted our spring garden earlier this year.  Here are some quick how-tos and tips for your 2014 garden.

IMG_0403

There they are – a winter’s growth of cover crops.  These guys are all ready to be folded back into last year’s soil which fed a bounty of tomatoes.  Now it’s time to feed the soil.

IMG_0411

There are a few articles out there on incorporating your cover crops into your soil beds.  One says to get a pair of garden shears and do a bit of a mowing, trimming them all before anything else.  We simply got a pitch fork and began turning the cover crops into the soil.  It looks like hard work but it was actually pretty easy.  The cover crops kept the soil moist and well aerated making short work of this task.  The other thing we noticed was the soil, which was a light brown when we planted last year, was rich and dark black with worms and other small critters thriving below the surface.  The beds were very much alive and healthy.

IMG_0414

When done, our beds looked like this.  Note that some of the greens are still at the surface.  We didn’t mind too much because we planned on amending the soil with a few bags of organic soil.  It is important, however, to make sure to cover up any of the greens.  Remember, these guys are still alive with roots in the ground.   You don’t want them to reestablished themselves amidst your new garden.

IMG_0415

We added “Edna’s Best” potting soil to our gardens since it had a nice mix of soil, mycorrhizal fungi, earthworm castings, kelp meal, bat guano, feather meal and a natural wetting agent.  It’s easy, just toss the bag on the garden bed, split it open with a shovel and then remove the bag.  All the soil dumps right where you want it.  We decided to spread it evenly across the top instead of folding it into the beds.  Since it rains fairly often in Portland, Oregon, the soil and nutrients will melt into the rest of the beds.  Again, this also keeps light away from any leftover cover crops to make sure they decompose into the soil.

IMG_0421

The finished project:  Soil is now spread evenly and ready for planting.

yard junk

In 2013, we had an old wire and metal pipe greenhouse that was showing its age.  We took it down and were planning on taking it to the dump.  However, part of our spring garden was peas that love to climb.  My wife, Rhonda (the brains of the operation), figured out a way to keep this out of the landfill while putting it back to work.

IMG_0433

She took the wire shelves and some old tomato hoops from the green house and created an attractive and stable structure for our peas to wrap themselves around.  The structures made it very easy to harvest the peas once they were ready.

IMG_0427

There are a lot of books and magazines on gardening in the Pacific Northwest, but save your money – if you plant to start from seed, all of the instructions including when and how to plant for your specific region, are on the back of the packet.  This would have saved me some money because I bough about a dozen heirloom tomato seeds anxious to get them going earlier this year but found it was too late.  Oh, well.  I’ll save them for next year and start them in egg shell starters.

IMG_0447

Using the poles from our old green house, we divided our beds up into sections for spinach, beets, onions, kale, and carrots.  A common mistake is to plant your crops and then forget to mark them.  They all look alike as seedlings and you won’t know what’s what until they are mostly grown.  For our spring garden, we simply followed the directions on spacing and number of seeds to plant.  We then looked around the yard for more material that would end up in the landfill.  We found some old boards from a planter box, broke them up, and then wrote on them with a green wax pencil to identify our different crops.

Now that the seeds are in the garden, make sure to water them well to wake them up.  Follow watering instructions for your plants, making sure not over-water, which will drown those new roots reaching down into the soil.

You can also be very strategic about planting certain types of plants in close proximity to one another.  Tomatoes and basil do well together.  Marigolds planted in your bed near your crops will function as a natural pest repellent and helps gauge the health of your garden.  There are many other tips and tricks to planting crops which we’ll cover in the coming weeks.

We’re so passionate about using recycled materials that we started a Kickstarter Campaign, where we are raising funds to bring our very first product, TogetherFarm Blocks™.  Made from food safe recycled plastics, it’s an easy way to quickly build a garden bed in a matter of minutes.  If you have a small space you can use these to quickly build a custom garden box without tools or carpentry experience.  Check them out!

TogetherFarm Blocks - the best way to build a garden box

TogetherFarm Blocks – Modular Garden Box System

 

 

2,000 total views, 1 views today

Use Up Those Summer Tomatoes

Garden Fresh Tomatoes

Garden Fresh Tomatoes

 

Here’s a great way to use up those summer tomatoes that may be stacking up and attracting fruit flies.

This peasant salad from Tuscany requires above all a good country bread that is a day or two old. In Tuscan dialect Panzanella  means “little swamp”, which is a description of the juice soaked bread. A good sturdy country loaf that is a day or two old can soak up the tomato and cucumber juices without becoming soggy.

Panzanella Salad Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 loaf of day old country bread like Como, or a Pugliese
  • 4 large tomatoes cut into 1″ dice
  • 1 TB Capers
  • 1/2 C good olive oil
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 cucumbers peeled and seeded and cut into 1/2″ dice
  • 1 bunch Italian Basil, chopped
  • 1/2 small red onion sliced thinly
  • Sea Salt + Coursely ground black pepper, to taste

The best thing about this recipe is that it can be assembled in a matter of minutes, which works great in busy households or in the event that you are just too beat to cook when you get home from work.  Here’s how to put it together:

  1. Cut the bread into 1-1/2″ thick cubes, set aside
  2. Mix together the tomatoes, cucumbers, capers, onion and basil
  3. Mix together the oil and vinegar and pour over the vegetables
  4. Add the bread, and mix all ingredients until coated with dressing
  5. Add salt + pepper to taste

Refrigerate salad for up to 1 hour.

If you are excited about growing your own tomatoes at home, you should check out our Kickstarter Campaign, where we are raising funds to bring our very first product, TogetherFarm Blocks™, to you.  If you have a small space you can use these to quickly build a custom garden box without tools or carpentry experience.  Check them out!

TogetherFarm Blocks™

TogetherFarm Blocks™

1,022 total views, no views today

3 Ways to Reduce Plastic Waste

Doug, Matt and I have shared a love of gardening and growing our own fresh local produce.  But we started this journey because we were also concerned about the environment; especially by the amount of plastic materials that end up in landfills or worse, our oceans.

After a couple of years of trying to figure out a way to help get more people excited about growing food while simultaneously reducing the amount of junk people tossed out, one of us said, “What if you could take plastic and turn it into produce?  How cool would that be?”

It may sound far-fetched but from this single funny question, TogetherFarm Blocks™ – made from food safe recycled plastic – were born.  We are in the middle of a Kickstarter Campaign, trying to raise enough money to get the blocks to market.

Here are some other great ways to reduce plastic waste and keep it out of our oceans.

1) Don’t buy packaging made from first run materials.

More and more companies are starting to get on board with reduced or non-plastic packaging.  Patronize these companies rather than ones that seal their products in layers and layers of clear plastic.  For example, Amazon.com ships items with Frustration-free packaging.  Info from their site:

Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging is a multi-year initiative designed to alleviate ‘wrap rage’–the frustration of trying to free a product from a nearly impenetrable package. Using recyclable boxes that are easy to open and free of excess materials such as hard plastic clamshell cases, plastic bindings, and wire ties, Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging is designed to be opened without the use of a box cutter or knife and will protect your product just as well as traditional packaging.

2) Food container and utensil waste

I love a good food cart as much as the next person.  But if you are getting that “Gourmet Organic Peanut Butter and Himalayan Huckleberry Jelly Sandwich” in a clear plastic clam shell container, picking up a plastic fork & knife, and a plastic straw to slurp up your fruit smoothie, you’re contributing to the waste pile.  This is pretty evident at carts and restaurants as plastic trash overflows from nearby cans.  Also try saying “no” to the ten packets of ketchup in plastic pouches that end up, often times, unused and unopened in the trash.

3)  Gum.  (Seriously?)

Seattle gum wall.
I’m not going to lie.  Until I started researching this article, I had no idea gum was a source of plastic waste.  Rather than comment, I’m going to quote from Mother Nature Network since I’m still too surprised and thinking about all the gum I’ve swallowed as a kid:

Gum was originally made from tree sap called chicle, a natural rubber, but when scientists created synthetic rubber, polyethylene and polyvinyl acetate began to replace the natural rubber in most gum. Not only are you chewing on plastic, but you may also be chewing on toxic plastic — polyvinyl acetate is manufactured using vinyl acetate, a chemical shown to cause tumors in lab rats. While it is possible to recycle your gum, it may be best to skip it — and its plastic packaging — altogether.

For more tips, check out the full article from MMN here:  http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/responsible-living/photos/16-simple-ways-to-reduce-plastic-waste

As always, let us know how you curb your plastic waste in the comments.

2,130 total views, no views today