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Summer Produce Gardening Tips

Honey Bee on Red Echinacea

Honey Bee on Red Echinacea

It has been quiet at TogetherFarm’s blog but we’ve been busy bees on our end and in our gardens and have some great summer produce gardening tips.

So far, it’s only mid-June and all of our gardens here have exploded ahead of schedule by at least one month.  This also pertains to our animal and insect life as well as our water levels.  Will fall come early?  Will summer linger on beyond its welcome?  Will we have another snow year like we did in 2008?

Only time will tell.

One thing you can count on are great gardening tips from TogetherFarm gathered up from around the web.

Mixed Salad Greens and Peas

Mixed Salad Greens and Peas

Think it’s too late to start a produce garden?  Think again.  Portland Nursery says there are plenty of things to put in the ground in June, including salad greens, such as, “a few lettuce varieties that resist bolting include: Jericho, Lollo Rosso, Merlot, Oakleaf types, and Red Sails. Plus Arugula ‘Sylvetta’.”  Greens in our garden have (above) have done extremely well and my wife and I are eating delicious hand picked greens nearly every night and still have to give it away to friends, neighbors and just about anyone we can corner.

They also say that with  there’s still time to plant basil, green beans, corn, cucumbers, and summer squash from seeds or starts.

Being a big tomato fan, I was excited to see that others can get a head start on these delicious fruits as well as peppers and eggplants that are in one-gallon pots that are less than 65 days to maturity.  These guys will start yielding wonderful produce in September if you get a move on and plant by the end of June.   Finally, mark your calendars:  the last week of June is also your last chance to get starts of melons, pumpkins, sweet potatoes and winter squash in the ground.

Cascade, Galena and Centennial hops

Cascade, Galena and Centennial hops

I’ve also been by my local home-brew store and have noticed you can still pick up mature starts of hops in half-gallon buckets if you want to try these guys out with minimal risk.  Mine have taken off (planted back in late March) and are already scaling the twine I’ve run from the wine barrels to the rain gutters.  As mentioned in our earlier article on growing hops in your garden, it’s relatively easy to do and the plants will provide immediate shade and beautiful flower cones you can either use or pass along to that home brewer you know.

Sugar Peas

Sugar Peas

Oh, and remember that article we posted on using recycled materials in the garden?  It’s not to late to get started.  We did when we planted our peas back in early April and now they are yielding a bumper crop.  These guys certainly live up to their name and have a nice snap when shelling (if you are not eating them whole off the vine like we do) and the peas are tender and delicious.  When looking at the garden structure, the original greenhouse materials used to create the cage are no longer visible.

Peas and Salad Greens

Peas and Salad Greens

Well, enough writing for now, time for a fresh organic dinner prepared from our yard.  What have been your garden success/failure stories so far this year?  Please leave some in our comments area along with any photos you’d like to share.  Happy gardening!

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