Tag Archives | urban gardening

Last few days to Pre-order TogetherFarm Blocks on Kickstarter!

Kickstarter Campaign for TogetherFarm Blocks

The TogetherFarm Team has been hard at work the past 4 weeks getting the word out about TogetherFarm Blocks. Our Kickstarter campaign continues to progress towards being fully funded and there’s still time for you to pledge and receive a garden kit of your own. The Kickstarter Campaign will end on September 23rd at about 9pm. So, hurry on over to the TogetherFarm Kickstarter page and make your pledge before it is too late. Be a part of a movement that is empowering more people to grow their own produce. Follow this link to make your pledge now:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/togetherfarm/turning-plastic-into-produce-togetherfarm-blocks

Kickstarter Campaign for TogetherFarm Blocks

We already have over 350 backers of TogetherFarm Blocks on Kickstarter. Each of these people is receiving an incredible reward for their pledge. Here are some quotes from some of our recent fans:

  • “I always try to tell people that if they have a few square feet of sun, they can grow some food. TogetherFarm Blocks will help with that mission.”
  • “What a great product for those of us who are disabled and the ground is just a little too far away.”
  • “I love this idea – it is what I have been looking for, in particular, the fact it does not involve me measuring and cutting my own garden box.”
  • “Love the idea of these blocks and the ease of building raised beds anywhere.”
  • “I have built my own planter boxes before, but it involved a chop saw and lumber. This looked WAY more fun, and right up my alley.”

And the list goes on! People all over are excited about TogetherFarm Blocks. If you haven’t pledged yet, would you consider doing that right now? Here is the link:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/togetherfarm/turning-plastic-into-produce-togetherfarm-blocks

Thanks so much for your support!

 

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What to do with extra (large) Zucchini – 3 Delicious Recipes

This article will explain what to do with extra (large) Zucchini by giving 3 delicious recipes.

Every year my garden produces way more zucchini than we can keep up with. We are always giving zucchini away to friends and neighbors but even so, we end up with extra large zucchinis that we don’t want to go to waste. This summer, we discovered a few ways to put these zucchinis to good use. Here are 3 easy recipes that work great with large Zucchini:

1. Grilled Zucchini

What to do with extra (large) Zucchini - 3 Delicious Recipes

This is so easy to do and really delicious. All you need to do is slice the zucchini into long flat strips that are about 1/4″ thick. I usually leave the skin on to hold the pieces together better. Then, put the zucchini on your BBQ and pour a little bit of soy sauce on each piece. Then, add salt and pepper.

What to do with extra (large) Zucchini - 3 Delicious Recipes

When you flip the pieces of zucchini over, the soy sauce, salt, and pepper will all get grilled into the zucchini adding a ton of flavor. Once the zucchini starts turning slightly transluscent, you know it’s ready. Take it off to serve and enjoy!

2. Zucchini as a pasta replacement in Pesto

This is one of the coolest things we discovered this summer. My brother-in-law told us about this and then made it for us at a family reunion. It was so delicious! What you do is make normal pesto (we typically buy the pesto mix at the store but you can also make your own if you have lots of basil handy), but instead of adding pasta noodles, you use zucchini noodles from your large zucchini. To prep the zucchini, use a thick cheese grader or simply cut the zucchini into thin spaghetti like strips. Then, quickly cook the zucchini for about 4 minutes. Put it into a strainer to let it drain. Then, add to your pesto mix in place of adding pasta noodles with a little bit of olive oil and additional fresh basil if you have it. Mix it up and add some salt and pepper to taste. That’s it. Now you have a low-carb, delicious, and healthy meal that uses up your large zucchini.

3. Zucchini Bread or Muffins

Zucchini Bread or Muffins is the default go to use of large zucchinis. Zucchini bread not only tastes delicious, but it is also really healthy for you because of the large amount of zucchini you use. There are dozens of recipes online that you can choose from. Here are a few links to ones that I like:

  • Super Moist Zucchini Bread or Muffins (healthy): http://allrecipes.com/recipe/super-moist-zucchini-bread/
  • Mom’s Zucchini Bread: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/moms-zucchini-bread/

Do you have additional recipes or ways that you use zucchini? Let us know in the comments.

If you have never grown zucchini or any other produce of your own, TogetherFarm has made a much easier way for you to do that. We want everyone to experience the benefits and flavor or homegrown produce and so we have created a modular garden box that doesn’t require tools to build and can be built in any shape or size. The modular garden box system is called TogetherFarm Blocks. The blocks are made from 100% recycled food-grade plastic so they are good for the environment too! You can pre-order your garden box kit on Kickstarter by following this link:

TogetherFarm Blocks on Kickstarter

Kickstarter Campaign for TogetherFarm Blocks

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Gardening with Recycled Materials

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We’ll keep it short on words and long on pictures in this post as we review different ways of gardening using recycled materials.  My wife and I prepped and planted our spring garden earlier this year.  Here are some quick how-tos and tips for your 2014 garden.

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There they are – a winter’s growth of cover crops.  These guys are all ready to be folded back into last year’s soil which fed a bounty of tomatoes.  Now it’s time to feed the soil.

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There are a few articles out there on incorporating your cover crops into your soil beds.  One says to get a pair of garden shears and do a bit of a mowing, trimming them all before anything else.  We simply got a pitch fork and began turning the cover crops into the soil.  It looks like hard work but it was actually pretty easy.  The cover crops kept the soil moist and well aerated making short work of this task.  The other thing we noticed was the soil, which was a light brown when we planted last year, was rich and dark black with worms and other small critters thriving below the surface.  The beds were very much alive and healthy.

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When done, our beds looked like this.  Note that some of the greens are still at the surface.  We didn’t mind too much because we planned on amending the soil with a few bags of organic soil.  It is important, however, to make sure to cover up any of the greens.  Remember, these guys are still alive with roots in the ground.   You don’t want them to reestablished themselves amidst your new garden.

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We added “Edna’s Best” potting soil to our gardens since it had a nice mix of soil, mycorrhizal fungi, earthworm castings, kelp meal, bat guano, feather meal and a natural wetting agent.  It’s easy, just toss the bag on the garden bed, split it open with a shovel and then remove the bag.  All the soil dumps right where you want it.  We decided to spread it evenly across the top instead of folding it into the beds.  Since it rains fairly often in Portland, Oregon, the soil and nutrients will melt into the rest of the beds.  Again, this also keeps light away from any leftover cover crops to make sure they decompose into the soil.

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The finished project:  Soil is now spread evenly and ready for planting.

yard junk

In 2013, we had an old wire and metal pipe greenhouse that was showing its age.  We took it down and were planning on taking it to the dump.  However, part of our spring garden was peas that love to climb.  My wife, Rhonda (the brains of the operation), figured out a way to keep this out of the landfill while putting it back to work.

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She took the wire shelves and some old tomato hoops from the green house and created an attractive and stable structure for our peas to wrap themselves around.  The structures made it very easy to harvest the peas once they were ready.

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There are a lot of books and magazines on gardening in the Pacific Northwest, but save your money – if you plant to start from seed, all of the instructions including when and how to plant for your specific region, are on the back of the packet.  This would have saved me some money because I bough about a dozen heirloom tomato seeds anxious to get them going earlier this year but found it was too late.  Oh, well.  I’ll save them for next year and start them in egg shell starters.

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Using the poles from our old green house, we divided our beds up into sections for spinach, beets, onions, kale, and carrots.  A common mistake is to plant your crops and then forget to mark them.  They all look alike as seedlings and you won’t know what’s what until they are mostly grown.  For our spring garden, we simply followed the directions on spacing and number of seeds to plant.  We then looked around the yard for more material that would end up in the landfill.  We found some old boards from a planter box, broke them up, and then wrote on them with a green wax pencil to identify our different crops.

Now that the seeds are in the garden, make sure to water them well to wake them up.  Follow watering instructions for your plants, making sure not over-water, which will drown those new roots reaching down into the soil.

You can also be very strategic about planting certain types of plants in close proximity to one another.  Tomatoes and basil do well together.  Marigolds planted in your bed near your crops will function as a natural pest repellent and helps gauge the health of your garden.  There are many other tips and tricks to planting crops which we’ll cover in the coming weeks.

We’re so passionate about using recycled materials that we started a Kickstarter Campaign, where we are raising funds to bring our very first product, TogetherFarm Blocks™.  Made from food safe recycled plastics, it’s an easy way to quickly build a garden bed in a matter of minutes.  If you have a small space you can use these to quickly build a custom garden box without tools or carpentry experience.  Check them out!

TogetherFarm Blocks - the best way to build a garden box

TogetherFarm Blocks – Modular Garden Box System

 

 

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Can your garden box do tricks? Introducing TogetherFarm Blocks

This post reviews TogetherFarm’s recently unveiled TogetherFarm Blocks – the best and easiest way to build a garden box.

TogetherFarm recently launched a Kickstarter Campaign to get TogetherFarm Blocks to market. Check out this link to learn more and to support the project:

TogetherFarm Kickstarter Campaign

Kickstarter Campaign for TogetherFarm BlocksMost garden boxes are pretty boring when you think about it. Just a plain square or sometimes a rectangle. If you want to get creative, you have to be a professional carpenter.

TogetherFarm Blocks changes all this because our blocks can do tricks – your imagination is the limit. We have designed a modular garden box system that is made out of 100% recycled plastic. Each of the individual blocks clip together to form a garden box in whatever shape or size you want. Since most of us have gotten so accustomed to thinking of gardening boxes as, well, a box, we wanted to share some of the possible layouts that you can do with each of the kits sizes – thinking outside of the box, if you will! Here are just a few of the layouts you can do with a TogetherFarm Blocks’ garden box kit. But don’t let these examples stop you. There are dozens more configurations that are possible.

Can your garden box do tricks? Introducing TogetherFarm Blocks

 

And, you don’t need any tools to assemble TogetherFarm Blocks. There is no cutting, no measuring, and no heavy lifting. Additionally, the blocks can easily be taken with you if you move. Here is what one of our newest fans said, “TogetherFarm blocks are ideally suited to renters like ourselves, who have ended up spending a couple hundred bucks at every rental house building our own wooden beds because we can’t stand to live without a garden :)!” This is just one of the many features that TogetherFarm Blocks provide to those who want to grow their own produce.

As we gear up for manufacturing, we need your help to get these blocks to market. TogetherFarm has launched a Kickstarter Campaign where we hope to raise enough funds to cover the mold and tooling costs to produce TogetherFarm Blocks. With your help, more people will have access to their own home grown produce. You can pledge at whatever level you want – from $1 and up. Those who pledge $35 or more will receive TogetherFarm Blocks of their own as a thank you for supporting the campaign. Here is the link to the Kickstarter Campaign:

TogetherFarm Kickstarter Campaign

And, thanks so much for your support!

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